Monday, September 24, 2012

Optimizing Mobile Device Battery Run-time Seminars


On many occasions in the past here both I, and my colleague, Gary, have written about measuring, evaluating, and optimizing battery life of mobile wireless battery powered devices. There is no question that, as all kinds of new and innovative capabilities and devices are introduced; battery life continues to become an even greater challenge.

I recently gave a two-part webcast entitled “Optimize Wireless Device Battery Run-time”. In the first part “Innovative Measurements for Greater Insights” a variety of measurement techniques are employed on a number of different wireless devices to illustrate the nature of how these devices operate and draw power from their batteries over time, and in turn how to go about making and analyzing the measurements to improve the device’s battery run-time. Some key points brought out in this first part include:
  • Mobile devices operate in short bursts of activities to conserve power. The resulting current drain is pulsed, spanning a wide dynamic range. This can be challenging for a lot of traditional equipment to accurately measure.
  • Not only is a high level of dynamic range of measurement needed for amplitude, but it is also needed on the time axis as well, for gaining deeper insights on optimizing a device’s battery run-time.
  • Over long periods of time a wireless device’s activity tends to be random in nature. Displaying and analyzing long term current drain in distribution plots can quickly and concisely display and quantify currents relating to specific activities and sub-circuits that would otherwise be difficult to directly observe in a data log.
  • The battery’s characteristics influence the current and power drawn by the device. When powering the device by other than its battery, it can be a significant source of error in testing if it does not provide results like that of when using the battery.


Going beyond evaluating and optimizing the way the device makes efficient use of its battery power, the second part, “The Battery, its End Use, and Its Management” brings out the importance of, and how to go about making certain you are getting the most of the limited amount of battery power you have available to you. Some key points for this second part include:
  • Validating the battery’s stated capacity is a crucial first step both for being certain you are getting what is expected from the battery and serve as a starting reference point that you can correlate back to the manufacturer’s data.
  • Evaluating the battery under actual end-use conditions is important as the dynamic loading a wireless device places on the battery often adversely affects the capacity obtained from the battery.
  • Charging, for rechargeable batteries, must be carefully performed under stated conditions in order to be certain of in turn getting the correct amount of capacity back out of the battery. Even very small differences in charging conditions can lead to significant differences in charge delivered during the discharge of the battery.
  • The wireless device’s battery management system (or BMS) needs to be validated for proper charging of the battery as well as suitability for addressing the particular performance needs of the device.


In Figure 1 the actual charging regiment was captured on a mobile phone battery being charged by its BMS. There turned out to be a number of notable differences in comparison to when the battery was charged using a standard charging regiment.



Figure 1: Validating BMS charge regiment on a GSM/GPRS mobile phone

If you are interested in learning more about optimizing wireless device battery run-time this two part seminar is now available on-demand at:


I think you will enjoy them!

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